Catie’s Infertility and PCOS Story

Each week I interview someone who has experienced infertility firsthand.  This week, I’m chatting with Catie from Little Wood Project.  She’s one of the nominees for RESOLVE’s 2015 Hope Award for Best Blog and she shares her infertility and PCOS story with us.  Enjoy!

infertility and pcos

Q. Tell us a little about yourself.

I am a portrait photographer and I have been married to my husband, a database administrator, for six years. We live in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, although I am from California and he is an Army brat, having moved several times throughout his childhood. We got married when we were 26, and since we had spent the majority of our dating relationship long-distance, we wanted to spend our first couple of years as a married couple, just the two of us. I remember telling my husband that I figured we could start trying right around turning 30…since my mom had always told me that your fertility declines and becomes more complicated after 35 (she is a maternity nurse). We had no idea what lay ahead.

Q. How long have you been trying to conceive and what issues are you facing?

We have been trying to conceive since early 2013 after stopping birth control pills at the end of 2012. In 2012, I was diagnosed with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) and had been put on birth control to regulate my periods since we were not trying to conceive. After coming off the pill, my periods came back on their own, but they ranged in irregularity from 31 days to 42 days in length. Finding out that I had PCOS was one of the answers as to why I had been having trouble losing weight. PCOS symptoms also include insulin resistance, unwanted facial hairs, sugar/carb cravings, irregular periods, anovulation, and infertility. Turns out that because of my PCOS symptoms, I was not ovulating regularly. We tried a couple rounds of Femara, a couple rounds of Clomid, and then two Clomid + trigger shot rounds. During the Femara rounds, I would go into the doctor to do a blood draw to confirm ovulation. Also, since my periods are irregular, the actual day of ovulation is kind of unpredictable. I was going to see my OBGYN for these first couple rounds of medicated cycles. One of the things she noticed is that my uterine lining was thin when they would do the ultrasounds to check on follicles. I had been referred to a Reproductive Endocrinologist to address the thin lining issue, but I had a terrible experience where I felt like the doctor wasn’t listening to me and I just felt really overwhelmed at the entire process. Right now we’re in the process of meeting with a new Reproductive Endocrinologist. We had a great consultation and I feel very confident in this new doctor. She was kind, empathetic, really listened to our concerns and took a thorough history- completely different than the other doctor.

[Read more…]

Weekly Infertility Link Up

I hope everyone is having a good week.  I don’t have much to say today- just the link up!  I’m looking forward to reading the posts you submit!

Here’s How It Works

  1. Leave your link in the comments below. Please tell us a little about your post or describe it.
  2. At the bottom of your post, please link back to my blog so others can find the link-up. You can use the button below, if you wish. A text link is fine, too.
  3. Please visit at least one other blog in the link-up and leave a comment there. This is so important because the goal of a link-up is to generate community!
AmateurNester

When Your Husband Doesn’t Understand Infertility Emotions {Ask Me Anything}

This post is part of the Ask Me Anything” series. I answer reader-submitted questions about our experience with infertility and IVF.

A reader asks, “What do you do when your husband doesn’t understand infertility and the hurt that you are going through, or the sense of urgency in trying to get pregnant?”

Here’s my answer: I cried. A lot. I researched obsessively and told him all about it. That’s about it. And let me tell you, it did not work well.

For a better answer, I thought I’d have my husband share some of his thoughts. We hope they’re helpful.

husband-doesn't-understand-infertility

I must approach this topic carefully as I come from a husband’s perspective, but I do hope I can offer something of value. First, let’s talk about the covenant of marriage. My wife and I entered into a covenant, not a contract, that we would love one another, fight for one another, no matter the circumstances, until death do us part.

Now that my preaching is done, I want to fully admit there were times I wanted to give up.  Infertility is so freaking scary.  It is one of the hardest things a couple can go through, and no one ever should tell you (or your husband) that it’s not okay to get really upset.

If you’re going through infertility, you can be sure that your husband is hurting a great deal. Despite what our culture says, being a father is a desire that most males have. Any threat to fulfilling that desire is difficult and frightening.  [Read more…]

When Your Daughter Struggles With Infertility, Too {Janet’s Story}

Each week I interview someone who has experienced infertility firsthand. This week I’m interviewing Janet Thompson, author of 18 books and the founder of Woman to Woman mentoring. She shares her infertility story and that of her two daughters, too. Enjoy!

infertility-story


Q.  Tell us a little about yourself.

I’m a Christian author, speaker, and editor and the founder of Woman to Woman Mentoring and About His Work Ministries. The Lord has had me doing His work writing 18 books and speaking around the USA and Canada. My husband, Dave, and I are the grandparents of 11 grandchildren and we enjoy life in the rural mountains of Idaho after living in Southern California my entire life.

infertility story

Q.  Your book features your infertility story and that of your two daughters. Briefly describe the struggles each of you faced.

I was told after an emergency appendectomy in my senior year of college, which turned out to be a ruptured ovarian cyst, that my ovaries looked like those of a 90 year-old woman and I would never have children. I was engaged to be married and devastated by the news. However, I was blessed to get pregnant naturally with my miracle baby, Kim. I always worried that she too might have fertility issues, which alarmingly she did.

After several failed attempts at artificial insemination, they adopted my sweet grandson and apparently Kim got pregnant the night before they picked him up. People tend to say that happens all the time, but it really doesn’t. You just hear about those times. Kim and her husband felt like adopting was God’s ministry plan for them, and when they did, God blessed them with a baby, but they would have been fine with adopting more.

As it turned out Kim had two natural pregnancies. My step-daughter, Shannon, was married seven years with no baby so they did IVF successfully, but she did lose a fallopian tube. However, they tried four more times over a six-year period to have a second child so she knows the heartache of secondary infertility. Finally, the fifth time they were successful, but it took a toll on their marriage.   After going through bankruptcy and losing their home, they separated and later divorced when their second child was only two years old- a heartbreak to everyone. [Read more…]

A Vote & the Weekly Infertility Link Up

Before we get to the weekly infertility link up, I wanted to take a minute to make sure you’re all aware of this year’s nominees for RESOLVE’s Hope Award for Best Blog. I was a nominee last year, and I was so excited to see who got nominated this year.
Each of the nominees are fantastic in their own way. If you’re not already familiar with them, I encourage you to take the time to browse their sites and vote for the one you think is most deserving.


Now Onto the Link Up…Here’s How It Works

  1. Leave your link in the comments below. Please tell us a little about your post or describe it.
  2. At the bottom of your post, please link back to my blog so others can find the link-up. You can use the button below, if you wish. A text link is fine, too.
  3. Please visit at least one other blog in the link-up and leave a comment there. This is so important because the goal of a link-up is to generate community!
AmateurNester